How to make your CV look better

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There really is nothing worse than applying for jobs (yep, it’s true). It’s time-consuming, it’s boring, it’s tedious, and nowadays, the applications are so long they’re pretty much a job in itself. However, there are still companies out there who simply want a CV to look over – which is great for us. Unfortunately, these employers receive hundreds of CVs every single year, from people with the same qualifications and experience as you. So how do you stand out? Well, a perfectly constructed CV can do wonders, so check out how you can make your CV look better…

Check the content

Making your CV look cool and aesthetically pleasing is all well and good – but it can’t completely cover rubbish content. So, before you start making changes to the font and layout, make sure you have all the relevant information on your CV that will impress the potential employer, and show them that you have all of the relevant skills and experience required for the role. Check you have your full employment history on the CV, your education history, and your contact details. It’s also best to get this done before you make any changes to formatting, as this can go astray once you start adding more content.

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Use a template

If you’re starting a CV from scratch and have absolutely no idea how to go about it (don’t worry, we’ve all been there), it’s best to use a template. You can find free CV templates through a quick Google search. However, there are numerous outdated and ugly-looking CV’s out there, so it’s up to you to change it around and add your own little flair to it.

Choose a font

I mean, does anyone really use Times New Roman anymore? We hope not. When writing your CV, it can be easy to fall into the trap of using default fonts, because they are deemed ‘professional’ and ‘appropriate.’ However, if you are using the same font as everyone else, your CV will simply fall into the same pile – and they are normally big piles. Instead, play around with different fonts on Microsoft Word. This might take you a while, as there are literally hundreds to choose from, but they can really make your CV stand out. It’s important to keep the job-role in mind though. For example, if you’re applying for a job as a lawyer, it would be unwise to choose arty fonts that take away from the content. However, if you’re applying for a job as a graphic designer, the artier… the better!

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Make it easily skimmable

With so many CVs to read over, employers don’t want someone’s life story – because the likelihood is, they’ll give up halfway through and simply chuck it to the bottom of the pile. Nowadays, most employers read CVs on the computer, which means it needs to be easily skimmable, so they can get the main bulk of information about the candidate and move on to the next one. The best way to make your CV super skimmable is to make your headings clean and concise so that the reader can move quickly from one section to the next, and find exactly what they’re looking for. Also, it is best to avoid huge blocks of text. Yes, we all want to give as much information as possible on our CV to give us the best chance, but many employers will be put off by block text and avoid reading it entirely – this means they might not read the most important information, which could cost you the job.

Add in links where necessary

If you’re a writer, a photographer, a designer or someone who works in the creative industry, you probably have pieces of work you want to show off. Of course, this is impossible on a CV as you can’t attach your whole novel – but you can provide links to this work. If you really want to impress a potential employer, you could create an online portfolio, and provide the link to this on your CV.

Are you looking to make your CV better? Just follow these simple steps to employment…

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