Some of the funniest IKEA fails you’ll ever see

A day trip to IKEA is quite possibly one of the most fun activities you can do in the world. You know it’s true. You get to take in the Swedish culture, you allow yourself to get lost within its hallowed walkways, you manage to find items that you would never find anywhere else in the world, and you get to finish off your day with yummy meatballs and lingonberry jam. A trip to IKEA is basically your very own European mini-break. That’s before you take into account the post-mini-break activity where you get to unpack your flat-pack furniture and attempt to incorporate it back into your house, like your very own suitcase…

continue >>

IKEA was founded in 1943 by Ingvar Kamprad when he was just 17 years old. If that doesn’t make you feel pretty darn rotten about yourself, then this probably will – before his death in January 2018, Ingvar had worked up a net worth of a whopping $58.7 billion! However, we have to give the man credit, because this dude provided us with one of the best stores in the world. In fact, IKEA has been the largest furniture retailer in the world since 2008, and it doesn’t show signs of stopping any time soon. With over 400 stores in more than 45 countries, it’s fair to say that most of us have taken a trip to IKEA in our lives. We’ve stood underneath the iconic yellow and blue sign, made sure we’ve been properly fed and watered, taken a quick trip to the restroom, and made sure that we have a few snacks along the way to prepare us for an intense few hours without daylight or fresh air. Although we have to admit, it’s totally worth it. You gotta go hard or go home, after all. From the cheap and cheerful designs to their flat-pack furniture that allows you to take a whole house home with you in your car, IKEA has it all.


ADVERTISEMENT

Despite the fact that we love a good day trip to IKEA, the fun normally stops when we get home and realize that most of us don’t have an ounce of DIY capabilities to our name. Sure, IKEA has made everything as easy as possible with their detailed instructions and flat-pack style – but that doesn’t make it easier for those who can’t use a screwdriver. It’s fair that most of us have saw or experienced firsthand an IKEA failure in one way or another.

continue >>


ADVERTISEMENT